Main

  • Ancient Greek law

    Ancient Greek law

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ancient Greek law

    • Ancient Greek government

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ancient Greek government


      Wikipedia
    • Ancient Greek lawyers

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ancient Greek lawyers


      Wikipedia
    • Ancient Greek law

    • Ancient Greek law consists of the laws and legal institutions of Ancient Greece. Scholars in the discipline of comparative law have compared Greek law with both Roman law and with the primitive institutions of the Germanic nations. It may now be studied in its earlier stages in the laws of Gortyn; its influence may be ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Against Timarchus

    • Against Timarchus (Greek: Κατὰ Τιμάρχου) was a speech by Aeschines accusing Timarchus of being unfit to involve himself in public life. The case was brought about in 346/5, in response to Timarchus, along with Demosthenes, bringing a suit against Aeschines, accusing him of miscondu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Agyrrhius

    • Agyrrhius (Greek: Ἀγύρριος) was a native of Collytus in Attica, whom Andocides ironically calls "the noble and the good" (τὸν καλὸν κἀγαθὸν) after being in prison many years for embezzlement of public money. He obtained around 395 BC the res ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Androlepsy

    • Androlepsy, in ancient Greek law, was a custom in Athens that if a citizen was killed abroad, and the criminal was not delivered for punishment, the victim's relatives were allowed to arrest as many as three citizens of the offending city. They would be held hostage until the actual criminal was handed over, and perhap ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Asylum (antiquity)

    • In ancient Greece and Rome, an asylum referred to a place where people facing persecution could seek refuge. These locations were largely religious in nature, such as temples and other religious sites. In ancient Greece the temples, altars, sacred groves, and statues of the gods generally possessed the privileges ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ateleia (ancient Greece)

    • Ateleia (Attic Greek: ἀτέλεια; privative a + τέλος telos (tax); see also philately) in ancient Greece was a general immunity (ἄδεια adeia) or exemption from some or all the duties which a person has to perform towards the state. Immunities could be granted either ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Athenian democracy

    • Athenian democracy developed around the fifth century BC in the Greek city-state (known as a polis) of Athens, comprising the city of Athens and the surrounding territory of Attica, and is the first known democracy in the world. Other Greek cities set up democracies, most following the Athenian model, but none are as w ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Athenian Grain-Tax Law of 374/3 B.C.


    • Law court (ancient Athens)

    • The law courts in ancient Athens (4th and 5th centuries BC) were a fundamental organ of democratic governance. According to Aristotle, whoever controls the courts controls the state. These courts were jury courts and very large ones: the smallest possible had 200 members (+1 to avoid ties) and sometimes 501, 1000 or 1 ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Atimia

    • Atimia was a form of disenfranchisement used under classical Athenian democracy. Under democracy in ancient Greece, only free adult Greek males were enfranchised as full citizens. Women, foreigners, children and slaves were not full citizens; they could not vote or hold public office, and they had to have adult males ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Bouleutic oath

    • The bouleutic oath was an oath sworn by the new councillors of the Boule. The oath was sworn after the councillors had passed their dokimasia (investigation) by the out-going Boule. According to Aristotle, the oath was introduced to Athens in 501/0 BC, during the archonship of Hermocreon. The contents of the oath can ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Delphinion

    • In ancient Greece, a Delphinion (ancient Greek: Δελφίνιον) was a temple of Apollo Delphinios ("Apollo of the womb") also known as "Delphic Apollo" or "Pythian Apollo", the principal god of Delphi, who was regarded as the protector of ports and ships. The ruin of the Delphinion in Miletus is ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Demiurge (magistrate)

    • A demiurge was a magistrate in Peloponnesian and other Ancient Greek city-states, including Corinth, Mantinea and Argos, and in their colonies, such as the Doric colony of Cnidus in Asia Minor. The English word for the title is an Anglicisation of Attic-Ionic δημιοργός, but because it was mos ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Diagoras of Melos

    • Diagoras "the Atheist" of Melos (Greek: Διαγόρας ὁ Μήλιος) was a Greek poet and sophist of the 5th century BC. Throughout Antiquity he was regarded as an atheist. With the exception of this one point, there is little information concerning his life and beliefs. He spoke ou ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Diocles of Syracuse

    • Diocles of Syracuse (Greek: Διοκλῆς) was a legislator, orator, and political and military leader in the Greek city-state of Syracuse toward the end of the 5th century BC. Only a few years of his life have an historical account, from 413 to 408 BC. The historian Diodorus Siculus presents Dioc ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dokimasia

    • In Ancient Greece, dokimasia (Greek: δοκιμασία) was the name used at Athens to denote the process of ascertaining the capacity of the citizens for the exercise of public rights and duties. If, for instance, a young citizen was to be admitted among the epheboi, he was examined in an assembly ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Draco (lawgiver)

    • Draco (lawgiver)

      Draco (/ˈdreɪkoʊ/; Greek: Δράκων, Drakōn; fl. c. 7th century BC) was the first recorded legislator of Athens in Ancient Greece. He replaced the prevailing system of oral law and blood feud by a written code to be enforced only by a court. Draco was the first democratic legislator, inasmuch ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Draconian constitution

    • Draconian constitution

      The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code created by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats. With most societies in Greece codifying basic law during the mid-seventh century BC, Athenian oral law wa ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dreros

    • Dreros (Ancient Greek: Δρῆρος), also (representing Modern Greek pronunciation) Driros, near Neapoli in the regional unit of Lasithi, Crete, is a post-Minoan archaeological site, 16 km northwest of Agios Nikolaos. Known only by a chance remark of the 9th-century Byzantine grammarian Theognostus ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Epidoseis

    • Epidoseis (Ancient Greek: ἐπιδόσεις) was a form of non-compulsory, non-tax financial giving in ancient Greece. These epidoseis were voluntary contributions, either in money, arms, or ships, which were made by the citizens of Athens in order to meet the extraordinary demands of the state ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Epigamia

    • In ancient Athens "epigamia" (Ancient Greek: ἐπιγαμία) designated the legal right to contract a marriage. In particular it regulated the right of intermarrying into another city-state. In the period of Athenian democracy, such intermarriage was not allowed, and only a decree of the popular ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Epikleros

    • An epikleros (ἐπίκληρος; plural epikleroi) was an heiress in ancient Athens and other ancient Greek city states, specifically a daughter of a man who had no male heirs. In Sparta, they were called patrouchoi (πατροῦχοι), as they were in Gortyn. Athenian women we ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Euthyna

    • The term euthyna (plural euthynai), meaning straightening, was the examination of accountability which every public officer underwent on the expiration of his office in Classical Greece. At Athens the examination had two parts; the logos ('statement of account'), concerned the handling of public money and dealt with by ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Gamelia

    • Gamelia (Γαμηλία) in ancient Athens may be a wedding customary law, or a name of a wedding festival or wedding solemnities in general. Gamelion was the name of the month (15 December- 15 January) in the Attic calendar, when marriages took place. The demes and phratries of Attica possessed various ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Gortyn code

    • The Gortyn code (also called the Great Code) was a legal code that was the codification of the civil law of the ancient Greek city-state of Gortyn in southern Crete. Our sole source of knowledge of the code is the fragmentary boustrophedon inscription on the circular walls of what might have been a bouleuterion or ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Graphe paranomon

    • The graphē paranómōn (Ancient Greek: γραφὴ παρανόμων), was a form of legal action believed to have been introduced at Athens under the democracy somewhere around the year 415 BC; it has been seen as a replacement for ostracism which fell into disuse around the sam ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Heliaia

    • Heliaia or Heliaea (Ancient Greek: Ἡλιαία; Doric: Ἁλία Halia) was the supreme court of ancient Athens. Τhe view generally held among scholars is that the court drew its name from the ancient Greek verb ἡλιάζεσθαι, which means ÏƒÏ…Î½Î±Î¸Ï ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Heliastic oath

    • The Heliastic oath (Ancient Greek: ἡλιαστικὸς ὅρκος; heliastikos horkos) was an oath sworn by jurors in the ancient Athenian law courts. In Demosthenes' speech Against Timocrates, the oath was quoted, and using quotations from other speeches, we can reconstruct the ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hieromenia

    • Hieromenia (sacred month's time), was the time of the month at which the sacred festivals of the Greeks began, and in consequence of which the whole month received the name of (sacred month). It was a part of the international law of Greece that all hostilities should cease for the time between states who took part i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Isopoliteia

    • An isopoliteia (Ancient Greek: ἰσοπολιτεία) was a treaty of equal citizenship rights between the poleis (city-states) of ancient Greece. This happened through either mutual agreement between cities or through exchange of individual decrees. It was used to cement amicable diplomatic ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Law of Leptines

    • Leptines (Greek: Λεπτίνης) was an Athenian orator. He is known as the proposer of a law that no Athenian, whether citizen or resident alien (with the sole exception of the descendants of Harmodius and Aristogeiton), should be exempt from the public charges (leitourgiai) for the state festivals. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Laws (dialogue)

    • The Laws (Greek: Νόμοι; Latin: De Legibus) is Plato's last and longest dialogue. The conversation depicted in the work's twelve books begins with the question of who is given the credit for establishing a civilization's laws. Its musings on the ethics of government and law have established it as a classi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Liberto

    • Liberto is both a given name and a surname of Italian descent. The term liberto derives from Greek: ἀπελεύθεροι, which means a freed slave. In ancient Greece, those freed slaves had various kinds of obligations toward their former owners and they did not have full citizens rights ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Liturgy (ancient Greece)

    • The liturgy (Greek: λειτουργία or λῃτουργία, , from λαός / Laos, "the people" and the root ἔργο / ergon, "work" ) was in ancient Greece a public service established by the city-state whereby its richest members (whether citizens or res ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lycurgus of Sparta

    • Lycurgus of Sparta

      Lycurgus (/laɪˈkɜːrɡəs/; Greek: Λυκοῦργος, Lykoûrgos, Ancient Greek: [lykôrÉ¡os] c. 900 – 800 BC) was the legendary lawgiver of Sparta who established the military-oriented reformation of Spartan society in accordance with the Oracle of Apollo at Delphi. Al ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Marriage in ancient Greece

    • The institution of marriage in ancient Greece encouraged responsibility in personal relationships. Marriages were usually arranged by the parents; professional matchmakers were reluctantly used. Each city was politically independent, with its own laws affecting marriage. Orphaned daughters were left to uncles or cousin ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Metic

    • In ancient Greece, a metic (Greek métoikos: from metá, indicating change, and oîkos "dwelling") was a foreign resident of Athens, one who did not have citizen rights in their Greek city-state (polis) of residence. The history of foreign migration to Athens dates back to the archaic period. Solon was said ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Moria (tree)

    • In ancient Greece, the moriai (plural of moria) were olive trees considered to be the property of the state because of their religious significance. From Attic Orators, vol. I. p. 289: Throughout Attica, besides the olives which were private property (ἴδιαι ἐλαῖαι, Lys. o ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Nicodorus of Mantineia

    • Nicodorus (fl. 425 BC) was an ancient Greek statesman of Mantineia. He was a notable lawgiver in his hometown and praised for his work by the controversial sophist Diagoras of Melos. Diagoras, who was later condemned as an atheist by the Athenians, reportedly assisted Nicodorus in his legislation. Both men wrote a cons ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Politics (Aristotle)

    • Politics (Greek: Πολιτικά) is a work of political philosophy by Aristotle, a 4th-century BC Greek philosopher. The end of the Nicomachean Ethics declared that the inquiry into ethics necessarily follows into politics, and the two works are frequently considered to be parts of a larger treatise, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Probolê


    • Proxeny

    • Proxeny or proxenia (Greek: προξενία) in ancient Greece was an arrangement whereby a citizen (chosen by the city) hosted foreign ambassadors at his own expense, in return for honorary titles from the state. The citizen was called proxenos (πρόξενος; plural: proxenoi or pr ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Prytaneis

    • The Prytaneis (πρυτάνεις; sing.: πρύτανις prytanis) were the executives of the boule of ancient Athens. The term (like basileus or tyrannos) is probably of Pre-Greek origin (possibly cognate to Etruscan (e)pruni). When Cleisthenes reorganized the Athenian governme ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Prytaneum

    • Prytaneum and Prytanis (Gr. root προ, first or chief). In general in ancient Greece, each state, city or village possessed its own central hearth and sacred fire, representing the unity and vitality of the community. The fire was kept alight continuously, tended by the king or members of his family. The buildi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Rhaphanidosis

    • Rhaphanidosis is the act of inserting the root of a plant of the raphanus genus (commonly known as a radish) into the anus. It is mentioned by Aristophanes as a punishment for adultery in Classical Athens in the fifth and fourth century BC. It is also allegedly a punishment for other sex-related crimes, such as promisc ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Trial of Socrates

    • The trial of Socrates (399 BC) was held to determine the philosopher’s guilt of two charges: asebeia (impiety) against the pantheon of Athens, and corruption of the youth of the city-state; the accusers cited two impious acts by Socrates: “failing to acknowledge the gods that the city acknowledges” and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Solonian Constitution

    • The Solonian Constitution was created by Solon in the early 6th century BC. At the time of Solon the Athenian State was almost falling to pieces in consequence of dissensions between the parties into which the population was divided. Solon wanted to revise or abolish the older laws of Draco. Solon promulgated a code of ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Sympoliteia

    • A sympoliteia or sympolity (Ancient Greek: συμπολιτεία "joint citizenship") was a type of treaty for political organization in ancient Greece. By the time of the Hellenistic period, it occurred in two forms. In mainland Greece, the term was often used for a federal state consisting o ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • The Wasps

    • The Wasps

      Silent Roles The Wasps (Greek: Σφῆκες Sphēkes) is the fourth in chronological order of the eleven surviving plays by Aristophanes, the master of an ancient genre of drama called 'Old Comedy'. It was produced at the Lenaia festival in 422 BC, a time when Athens was enjoying a brief respite from t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Xenelasia

    • Xenelasia (Ancient Greek: ξενηλασία, Ancient Greek: [ksenɛːlasía]) was the practice in ancient Doric Crete and Lacedæmonia of expelling foreigners deemed injurious to the public welfare. The isolationist customs of Sparta (which included discouraging Spartan citizens from tr ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Zaleucus

    • Zaleucus (Ancient Greek: Ζάλευκος; fl. 7th century BC) was the Greek lawgiver of Epizephyrian Locri, in Italy, said to have devised the first written Greek law code, the Locrian Code. Although the Locrian code distinctly favored the aristocracy, Zaleucus was famous for his conciliation of so ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    Wikipedia
  • What Else?

    • Ancient Greek law

Extras