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    Ancient Greek culture

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    • Culture of Ancient Athens

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    • Culture of Sparta

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    • Adaptations of works by ancient Greek writers

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    • Arts in ancient Greece

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    • Greek clothing

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    • Ancient Greek cuisine

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    • Sexuality in ancient Greece

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    • Festivals in Ancient Greece

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    • Ancient Greek language

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    • Ancient Greek leisure

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    • Ancient Greek literature

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    • Ancient Greek medicine

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    • Greek mythology

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    • National Archaeological Museum of Athens

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    • Ancient Greek philosophy

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    • Ancient Greek religion

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    • Ancient Greek titles

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    • Achaean Doric Greek

    • Achaean Doric Greek may refer to: ... Read »


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    • Acropolis Museum

    • Acropolis Museum

      The Acropolis Museum (Greek: Μουσείο Ακρόπολης, Mouseio Akropolis) is an archaeological museum focused on the findings of the archaeological site of the Acropolis of Athens. The museum was built to house every artifact found on the rock and on the surrounding slopes, from ... Read »


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    • Acropolis of Athens

    • Coordinates: 37°58′17″N 23°43′34″E / 37.971421°N 23.726166°E / 37.971421; 23.726166 The Acropolis of Athens (Ancient Greek: Ἀκρόπολις Akropolis;Modern Greek: Ακρόπολη Αθηνών Akrópoli Athenón [ ... Read »


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    • Adonia

    • Adonia (Greek: Ἀδώνια) or Feast of Adonis was an ancient festival mourning the death of Adonis. The date is uncertain, but may have been early Spring, or summer. It was a private, rather than a state festival, and was celebrated by women exclusively. According to one 1875 source, the festival l ... Read »


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    • Adultery in Classical Athens

    • In Classical Athens, there was no exact equivalent of the English term "adultery", but the similar moicheia (Ancient Greek: μοιχεία) was a criminal offence often translated as adultery by scholars. Athenian moicheia was restricted to illicit sex with free women, and so men could legally have ext ... Read »


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    • Aeacea

    • Aeacea, or Æacea, in antiquity, were solemn feasts and combats celebrated in Aegina in honor of Aeacus, who had been their king, and who, on account of his singular justice upon Earth, was supposed to have a commission given him to be one of the judges in Hell.  This article incorporates text from a publication ... Read »


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    • Amistad Onus

    • Amistad Onus (Translated from the Latin to: "Alliance Load" or "Friend Load") is the Latin name of a Tax that was famously first implemented by the Milesian school. The practice was quickly spread as students of the Milesian school became scholars themselves, and by 318 BC it was a common practice amongst many Greek sc ... Read »


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    • Amphidromia

    • The Amphidromia (Greek: τὰ Ἀμφιδρόμια), in ancient Greece, was a ceremonial feast celebrated on the fifth or seventh day after the birth of a child. It was a family festival of the Athenians, at which the newly born child was introduced into the family, and children of poorer fa ... Read »


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    • Ancient furniture

    • There are few survivals of ancient Greek and Roman furniture, but a number of images in reliefs, painted pottery and other media. It was normally made of wood, but expensive examples were often fitted with metalwork elements, which have a better chance of survival. The styles were generally rather light and elegant in ... Read »


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    • Ancient Greece and wine

    • The influence of wine in ancient Greece helped Ancient Greece trade with neighboring countries and regions. Many mannerisms and cultural aspects were associated with wine. It led to great change in Ancient Greece as well. The ancient Greeks pioneered new methods of viticulture and wine production that they shared with ... Read »


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    • Ancient Greek personal names

    • The study of ancient Greek personal names is a branch of onomastics, the study of names, and more specifically of anthroponomastics, the study of names of persons. There are hundreds of thousands and even millions of Greek names on record, making them an important resource for any general study of naming, as well as fo ... Read »


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    • Apellaia

    • The apellaia (ἀπελλαῖα) were the offerings made at the initiation of a young man (kouros) at a meeting of a family-group (φρατρία phratria) of the northwest Greeks.Apellaios (Ἀπελλαῖος) is the month of these rites and oferrings, and Apellon ... Read »


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    • Athenian pederasty

    • Athenian pederasty entailed a formal bond between an adult man and an adolescent boy outside his immediate family, consisting of loving and often sexual relations. As an erotic and educational custom it was initially employed by the upper class as a means of teaching the young and conveying to them important cultural v ... Read »


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    • Azoria

    • Azoria is an archaeological site on a double-peaked hill overlooking the Gulf of Mirabello in eastern Crete in the Greek Aegean. "Azoria" (o Αζοριάς or (c. 1900) Μουρί τ' Αζωργιά) is a local toponym, not apparently an ancient place name or epigraphically-attes ... Read »


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    • Caryatid

    • A caryatid (/kæriˈætɪd/; Greek: Καρυάτις, plural: Καρυάτιδες) is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on her head. The Greek term karyatides literally means "maide ... Read »


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    • Chthonic

    • Chthonic (UK /ˈkθɒnɪk/, US /ˈθɒnɪk/ from Greek χθόνιος khthonios [kÊ°tʰónios], "in, under, or beneath the earth", from χθών khthōn "earth") literally means "subterranean". The translation of meaning discusses deities or spirits of the underworld, espec ... Read »


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    • Coan wine

    • Coan wine is wine from the Greek island of Kos, and in particular a style of wine invented there in classical antiquity that was known for its saltiness. This distinctively salty style of wine was, according to Pliny, invented accidentally by a slave, who added sea water to the must to meet his production quota. T ... Read »


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    • Corolla (chaplet)

    • A corolla is an ancient headdress made of a garland or wreath and worn as a small circlet or crown. Usually it has ceremonial significance and represents victory or authority. The term corolla and/or corollæ appears in a chapter title in Pliny the Elder's Naturalis Historia: "Who invented the art of making garl ... Read »


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    • Cretan pederasty

    • Cretan pederasty was an archaic form of pederasty that involved the ritual kidnapping (harpagmos) of a noble boy by an adult male of the aristocratic class, with the consent of the boy's father. The man (known as philetor, "befriender") took the boy (known as kleinos, "glorious") into the wilderness, where they spent ... Read »


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    • Davul

    • Davul

      The davul or tupan is a large double-headed drum that is played with mallets. It has many names depending on the country and region. Some names of davuls include: These drums are commonly used in the folk music of Iran and Turkey, as well as Albania, Romania, Bulgaria and portions of Greece, Serbia and Macedonia ... Read »


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    • Diphros

    • Diphros (Greek: Δίφρος) was an Ancient Greek stool without back and with four turned legs. It was easily transportable and so in common use. Gods are shown sitting on diphroi on the Parthenon frieze; women used them in their home, Oikos. The foldable diphros was called δίφρος ὀ ... Read »


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    • Doric Greek

    • Doric Greek

      Doric or Dorian was an Ancient Greek dialect. Its variants were spoken in the southern and eastern Peloponnese, as well as in Sicily, Epirus, Macedonia, Southern Italy, Crete, Rhodes, some islands in the southern Aegean Sea and some cities on the south east coast of Anatolia. Together with Northwest Greek, it forms the ... Read »


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    • Epithalamium

    • An epithalamium (/ˌɛpᵻθəˈleɪmiəm/; Latin form of Greek ἐπιθαλάμιον epithalamion from ἐπί epi "upon," and θάλαμος thalamos nuptial chamber) is a poem written specifically for the bride on the way to her marital chamber. This for ... Read »


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    • Greek gardens

    • A distinction is made between Greek gardens, made in ancient Greece, and Hellenistic gardens, made under the influence of Greek culture in late classical times. Little is known about either. Before the coming of proto-Greeks into the Aegean, Minoan culture represented gardens, in the form of subtly tamed wild-seem ... Read »


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    • Glory (honor)

    • Glory is high renown, praise and honor obtained by notable achievements, and based in extensive common consent. In Greek culture fame and glory were highly considered, as it is explained in The Symposium, one of Plato's dialogs. Kleos (Greek: κλέος) is the Greek word often translated to "renown", or ... Read »


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    • Greek Baths

    • "The history of public baths begins in Greece in the sixth century B.C.," said by Françoise de Bonneville in his book The Book of the Bath. Greeks original form of bathing consisted of nothing more than a quick plunge into icy water until the people of Laconica came upon the idea of a hot-air bath. The hot-air b ... Read »


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    • Greek contributions to Islamic world

    • Greece played an important role in the transmission of classical knowledge to the Islamic world and to Renaissance Italy, and also in the transmission of medieval Arabic science to Renaissance Italy. Its rich historiographical tradition preserved ancient knowledge upon which art, architecture, literature and technologi ... Read »


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    • Greek divination

    • Greek divination is divination, which is a type of magic, as performed historically in ancient Greek culture. Within ancient Greece practice of divination, there were two groups who functioned differently in the aspect of the first being official divinaters, known as oracles, and the second, being independent divinate ... Read »


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    • Ancient Greek clubs

    • Ancient Greek clubs (Greek: ἑταιρείαι, hetaireiai) were associations of ancient Greeks who were united by a common interest or goal. The earliest reference of clubs in ancient Greece appears in the law of Solon, which is quoted in the Digest of Justinian I (47.22). This law guaranteed ... Read »


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    • Greco-Roman hairstyle

    • In the earliest times the Greeks wore their hair kome (long), and thus they are constantly called in Homer karekomoontes. This ancient practice was preserved by the Spartans for many centuries. The Spartan boys always had their hair cut quite short (en chroi keirontes); but as soon as they reached the age of puberty, t ... Read »


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    • Roman hairstyles

    • Hairstyle fashion in Rome was ever changing, and particularly in the Roman Imperial Period there were a number of different ways to style hair. As with clothes, there were several hairstyles that were limited to certain people in ancient society. Styles are so distinctive they allow scholars today to create a chronolog ... Read »


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    • Hospitium

    • Hospitium (Greek: ξενία, xenia, προξενία) is the ancient Greco-Roman concept of hospitality as a divine right of the guest and a divine duty of the host. Similar or broadly equivalent customs were and are also known in other cultures, though not always by that name. Among the Gree ... Read »


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    • Kalos kagathos

    • Kalos kagathos (Ancient Greek: καλὸς κἀγαθός [kalos kaːɡatʰós]), of which (καλοκαγαθία) is the derived noun, is a phrase used by classical Greek writers to describe an ideal of gentlemanly , especially in a military context. Its u ... Read »


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    • Kanephoros

    • The Kanephoros (Ancient Greek: Κανηφόρος (pl. Κανηφόροι Kanephoroi), latinate plural form Canephorae, "Basket Bearer(s)") was an honorific office given to unmarried young women in ancient Greece, which involved the privilege of leading the procession to sacrifice ... Read »


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    • Kleos

    • Kleos (Greek: κλέος) is the Greek word often translated to "renown", or "glory". It is related to the word "to hear" and carries the implied meaning of "what others hear about you". A Greek hero earns kleos through accomplishing great deeds, often through his own death. According to Gregory Nagy, beside ... Read »


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    • Klismos

    • A klismos (Greek: κλισμός) or klismos chair is a type of ancient Greek chair, familiar from depictions of ancient furniture on painted pottery and in bas-reliefs from the mid-fifth century BCE onwards. In epic, klismos signifies an armchair, but no specific description is given of its form; in Ilia ... Read »


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    • Kottabos

    • Kottabos (Ancient Greek: κότταβος) was a game of skill played at ancient Greek and Etruscan symposia (drinking parties), especially in the 5th and 4th centuries BC. The game is played by flinging wine lees at targets. The player would utter the name of the object of his affection. The game a ... Read »


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    • Ancient Greek literature

    • Ancient Greek literature refers to literature written in the Ancient Greek language from the earliest texts until roughly the rise of the Byzantine Empire. The earliest surviving works of ancient Greek literature are the two epic poems The Iliad and The Odyssey. These two epics, along with the Homeric Hymns and Theogon ... Read »


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    • Liturgy (ancient Greece)

    • The liturgy (Greek: λειτουργία or λῃτουργία, , from λαός / Laos, "the people" and the root ἔργο / ergon, "work" ) was in ancient Greece a public service established by the city-state whereby its richest members (whether citizens or res ... Read »


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    • Marriage in ancient Greece

    • The institution of marriage in ancient Greece encouraged responsibility in personal relationships. Marriages were usually arranged by the parents; professional matchmakers were reluctantly used. Each city was politically independent, with its own laws affecting marriage. Orphaned daughters were left to uncles or cousin ... Read »


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    • List of Mycenaean deities

    • This is an incomplete list of Mycenaean Greek deities and of the way their names, epithets, or titles are spelled and attested in Mycenaean Greek, written in the Linear Bsyllabary, along with some reconstructions and equivalent forms in later Greek. ... Read »


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    • Nike of Callimachus

    • The Nike of Callimachus (Greek: Nίκη του Καλλιμάχου) also known as The Dedication of Callimachus, is a statue that the Athenians created in honor of the Callimachus. Callimachus was the Athenian polemarch at the Battle of Marathon at 490 BC. He had the last vote and ... Read »


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    • Old Acropolis Museum

    • The Acropolis Museum

      The Old Acropolis Museum (Greek: (Παλαιό) Μουσείο Ακρόπολης (Palaio) Mouseio Akropolis) was an archaeological museum located in Athens, Greece on the archeological site of Acropolis. It is built in a niche at the eastern edge of the rock and most of it l ... Read »


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    • Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens

    • The Temple of Olympian Zeus (Greek: Ναός του Ολυμπίου Διός, Naos tou Olympiou Dios), also known as the Olympieion or Columns of the Olympian Zeus, is a monument of Greece and a former colossal temple at the centre of the Greek capital Athens. It was dedicated to ... Read »


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    • Paideia

    • In the culture of ancient Greece, the term paideia (also spelled paedeia) (/paɪˈdeɪə/;Greek: παιδεία) referred to the rearing and education of the ideal member of the polis. It incorporated both practical, subject-based schooling and a focus upon the socialization of individuals within ... Read »


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    • Parallel Lives

    • Plutarch's Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans, commonly called Parallel Lives or Plutarch's Lives, is a series of biographies of famous men, arranged in tandem to illuminate their common moral virtues or failings, probably written at the beginning of the second century AD. The surviving Parallel Lives (Greek: ΒΠ... Read »


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    • Pinax

    • In the modern study of the culture of ancient Greece and Magna Graecia, a pinax (πίναξ) (plural pinakes - πίνακες) or a "board", denotes a votive tablet of painted wood, or terracotta, marble or bronze relief that served as a votive object deposited in a sanctuary or as a memorial af ... Read »


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    • Propylaea

    • A propylaea, propylea or propylaia (/ˌprɒpɪˈliːə/; Greek: Προπύλαια) is any monumental gateway in Greek architecture. Much the best known Greek example is the propylaea that serves as the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. The Greek Revival Brandenburg Gate of Berlin and t ... Read »


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    • Ancient Greek religion

    • Ancient Greek religion encompasses the collection of beliefs, rituals, and mythology originating in ancient Greece in the form of both popular public religion and cult practices. These groups varied enough for it to be possible to speak of Greek religions or "cults" in the plural, though most of them shared similaritie ... Read »


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    • Sphinx

    • Sphinx

      A sphinx (Greek: Σφίγξ [sfiŋks], Boeotian: Φίξ ['fi(:)ks], plural sphinges) is a mythical creature with the head of a human and the body of a lion. In Greek tradition, it has the head of a human, the haunches of a lion, and sometimes the wings of a bird. It is mythicised as treacherous and m ... Read »


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    • Symposium

    • In ancient Greece, the symposium (Greek: συμπόσιον symposion, from συμπίνειν sympinein, "to drink together") was a drinking party. Literary works that describe or take place at a symposium include two Socratic dialogues, Plato's Symposium and Xenophon's Symposium, a ... Read »


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    • Syssitia

    • Syssitia

      This article is part of the series:Spartan Constitution The syssitia (Classical Greek: τὰ συσσίτια ta syssítia) was, in Ancient Greece, a common meal for men and youths in social or religious groups, especially in Crete and Sparta, though also in Megara in the time of Theognis (6th c ... Read »


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    • Triskelion

    • A triskelion or triskele is a motif consisting of a triple spiral exhibiting rotational symmetry. The spiral design can be based on interlocking Archimedean spirals, or represent three bent human legs. Both terms are from Greek "τρισκέλιον" (triskelion) or "τρισκελΠ... Read »


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    • Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology

    • Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology

      The Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology contains one of the most important collections of Greek antiquities in the United Kingdom. The Museum forms part of the Department of Classics at the University of Reading and is situated on the university's Whiteknights Campus, about 2 miles (3.2 km) from the centre of the Englis ... Read »


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    • Valley of the Muses

    • The Valley of the Muses was the site of an ancient Greek sanctuary to the Muses and the Mouseia festivals held in their honor. It is an open-air historical site open permanently to the public. It is located at Thespies on the eastern slopes of Mount Helicon in Boeotia, Greece. The recorded history of the valley be ... Read »


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    • Vergina Sun

    • The Vergina Sun (Greek Ήλιος της Βεργίνας, also known as the "Star of Vergina", "Macedonian Star" or "Argead Star") is a rayed solar symbol appearing in ancient Greek art of the period between the 6th and 2nd centuries BC. The Vergina Sun proper has sixteen triangular ray ... Read »


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    • Warp-weighted loom

    • The warp-weighted loom is a simple and ancient form of loom in which the warp yarns hang freely from a bar supported by upright poles which can be placed at a convenient slant against a wall. Bundles of warp threads are tied to hanging weights called loom weights which keep the threads taut. Evidence of the warp-weight ... Read »


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    • Worry stone

    • Worry stones (palm stones, thumb stones) are smooth, polished gemstones, usually in the shape of an oval with a thumb-sized , used for relaxation or anxiety relief. They are used by holding the stone between the index finger and thumb and gently moving one's thumb back and forth across the stone. From the perspective ... Read »


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    • Xenia (Greek)

    • Xenia (Greek: , xenía, trans. "guest-friendship") is the ancient Greek concept of hospitality, the generosity and courtesy shown to those who are far from home and/or associates of the person bestowing guest-friendship. The rituals of hospitality created and expressed a reciprocal relationship between guest and host ... Read »


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    • Xylospongium

    • The xylospongium, also known as sponge on a stick, is the ancient precursor of the modern toilet brush. It consists of a wooden stick (Greek: ξύλον, Xylon) with a sponge (Greek: Σπόγγος, Spongos) fixed at one end. In the classical antiquity a xylospongium might be used in the same w ... Read »


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