Main

  • Ancient Greek architecture

    Ancient Greek architecture

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ancient Greek architecture

    • Ancient Greek urban planners

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ancient Greek urban planners


      Wikipedia
    • Ancient Greek architects

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ancient Greek architects


      Wikipedia
    • Ancient Greek buildings and structures

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ancient Greek buildings and structures


      Wikipedia
    • Ancient Greek fortifications

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ancient Greek fortifications


      Wikipedia
    • Greek Revival architecture

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Greek Revival architecture


      Wikipedia
    • Gymnasiums (ancient Greece)

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Gymnasiums (ancient Greece)


      Wikipedia
    • Hellenistic architecture

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Hellenistic architecture


      Wikipedia
    • Mycenaean architecture

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Mycenaean architecture


      Wikipedia
    • Ancient Greek archaeological sites

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ancient Greek archaeological sites


      Wikipedia
    • Ancient Greek architecture

    • The architecture of ancient Greece is the architecture produced by the Greek-speaking people (Hellenic people) whose culture flourished on the Greek mainland, the Peloponnese, the Aegean Islands, and in colonies in Anatolia and Italy for a period from about 900 BC until the 1st century AD, with the earliest remaining a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • List of Ancient Greek temples

    • This list of ancient Greek temples covers temples built by the Hellenic people from the 6th century BC until the 2nd century AD on mainland Greece and in Hellenic towns in the Aegean Islands, Asia Minor, Sicily and Italy, wherever there were Greek colonies, and the establishment of Greek culture. Ancient Greek architec ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • List of ancient architectural records

    • The list of ancient architectural records consists of record-making architectural achievements of the Greco-Roman world from c. 800 BC to 600 AD. Ratio of clear span against rise, arch rib and pier thickness: ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • List of ancient Greek and Roman monoliths

    • This is a list of ancient monoliths found in all types of Greek and Roman buildings. It contains monoliths Transporting was done by land or water (or a combination of both), in the later case often by special-built ships such as obelisk carriers. For lifting operations, ancient cranes were employed since ca. 515 BC, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • List of ancient spiral stairs

    • The list of ancient spiral stairs contains a selection of Greco-Roman spiral stairs constructed during classical antiquity. The spiral stair is a type of stairway which, due to its complex helical structure, has been introduced relatively late into architecture. Although the oldest example dates back to the 5th century ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Acanthus (ornament)

    • The acanthus is one of the most common plant forms to make foliage ornament and decoration. In architecture, an ornament may be carved into stone or wood to resemble leaves from the Mediterranean species of the Acanthus genus of plants, which have deeply cut leaves with some similarity to those of the thistle and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Acropolis

    • An acropolis (Greek: ἀκρόπολις; from ákros or ákron "highest, topmost, outermost" and pólis "city"; plural in English: acropoles, acropoleis or acropolises) is a settlement, especially a citadel, built upon an area of elevated ground—frequently a hill with precipitous sides, c ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Acroterion

    • An acroterion or acroterium or akroteria is an architectural ornament placed on a flat base called the acroter or plinth, and mounted at the apex of the pediment of a building in the classical style. It may also be placed at the outer angles of the pediment; such acroteria are referred to as acroteria angularia ( means ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Adyton

    • The adyton (Greek: Άδυτον) or adytum (Latin) was a restricted area within the cella of a Greek or Roman temple. Its name meant "inaccessible" or "do not enter". The adyton was frequently a small area at the farthest end of the cella from the entrance: at Delphi it measured just nine by twelve feet. Th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Aeolic order

    • The Aeolic order or Aeolian order was an early order of Classical architecture. It has a strong similarity to the better known Ionic order, but differs in the capital, where a palmette rises between the two outer volutes, rather than them being linked horizontally by a form at the top of the capital. Many examples also ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Amphiprostyle

    • In classical architecture, amphiprostyle (from the Greek ἀμφί (amphi), on both sides, and πρόστυλος (prostylos), a portico) denotes a temple with a portico both at the front and the rear. The number of columns never exceeded four in the front and four in the rear. The best-known ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Anathyrosis

    • Anathyrosis is the technical term for how the ancients frequently dressed the joints of stone blocks. Since the blocks were set directly against each other without the use of mortar, the joint had to be exact. In order to reduce the amount of time required to form such a joint, the joining face of the stone was finishe ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • List of ancient Greek and Roman roofs

    • The list of ancient roofs comprises roof constructions from Greek and Roman architecture ordered by clear span. Most buildings in classical Greece were covered by traditional prop-and-lintel constructions, which often needed to include interior colonnades. In Sicily truss roofs presumably appeared as early as 550 BC. T ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Anta (architecture)

    • An anta (pl. antæ) (Latin, possibly from ante, 'before' or 'in front of'), or sometimes parastade is an architectural term describing the posts or pillars on either side of a doorway or entrance of a Greek temple - the slightly projecting piers which terminate the walls of the naos. It differs from the pilaster, whi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Anta capital

    • An Anta capital is the crowning portion of an anta, the front edge of a supporting wall in Greek temple architecture. The anta is generally crowned by a stone block designed to spread the load from superstructure (entablature) it supports, called an "anta capitals" when it is structural, or sometimes "pilaster capital" ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Antae temple

    • An Antae Temple, also a Distyle in antis Temple, is a special name given to a type of ancient Greek or Roman temple that has side walls that extend to form a porch at the front or rear (or both) and terminated in structural pillars that were called the antae. If columns were placed in advance of the walls or antae, the ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Antefix

    • An antefix (from Latin antefigere, to fasten before) is a vertical block which terminates the covering tiles of the roof of a tiled roof. In grand buildings the face of each stone ante-fix was richly carved, often with the anthemion ornament. In less grand buildings moulded ceramic ante-fixae, usually terracotta, might ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Athenian Treasury

    • Athenian Treasury

      The Athenian Treasury (Greek: Θησαυρός των Αθηναίων) at Delphi was constructed by the Athenians to house dedications made by their city and citizens to the sanctuary of Apollo. The entire treasury, including its sculptural decoration, is built of Parian marble; i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Atlas (architecture)

    • In classical European architecture, an atlas (also known as an atlant, or atlante or atlantid; plural atlantes) is a support sculpted in the form of a man, which may take the place of a column, a pier or a pilaster. The Roman term for such a sculptural support is telamon (plural telamones or telamons). The term atlant ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Azoria

    • Azoria is an archaeological site on a double-peaked hill overlooking the Gulf of Mirabello in eastern Crete in the Greek Aegean. "Azoria" (o Αζοριάς or (c. 1900) Μουρί τ' Αζωργιά) is a local toponym, not apparently an ancient place name or epigraphically-attes ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Belevi Mausoleum

    • The Belevi Mausoleum, also known as the Mausoleum at Belevi is a Hellenistic monument tomb located in Turkey. The monument was the burial place of the Seleucid Greek King Antiochus II Theos who reigned 261–246 BC. The Belevi Mausoleum was a grandiose tomb. The name of the mausoleum derives from the modern ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cadmea

    • The Cadmea, or Cadmeia (Greek: Καδμεία), was the citadel of ancient Thebes, Greece, which was named after Cadmus, the legendary founder of Thebes. The area is thought to have been settled since at least the early Bronze Age, although the history of settlement can only be reliably dated from the lat ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Caryatid

    • A caryatid (/kæriˈætɪd/; Greek: Καρυάτις, plural: Καρυάτιδες) is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on her head. The Greek term karyatides literally means "maide ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cella

    • A cella (from Latin for small chamber) or naos (from the Greek ναός, "temple") is the inner chamber of a temple in classical architecture, or a shop facing the street in domestic Roman architecture, such as a domus. Its enclosure within walls has given rise to extended meanings, of a hermit's or monk's cell ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Classical order

    • External video

      "An Order in architecture is a certain assemblage of parts subject to uniform established proportions, regulated by the office that each part has to perform". The Architectural Orders are the ancient styles of classical architecture, each distinguished by its proportions and characteristic profiles and details, and mos ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Conisterium

    • A conisterium (or conisterion) was an apartment in Ancient Rome and Ancient Greece gymnasiums. It was where sand or dust was stored, for use by wrestlers after they had been anointed with oil. They would either sprinkle it on themselves, or a slave would do it. The purpose of this was so that during a fight, the oil or ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Corinthian order

    • The Corinthian order is the last developed of the three principal classical orders of ancient Greek and Roman architecture. The other two are the Doric order which was the earliest, followed by the Ionic order. When classical architecture was revived during the Renaissance, two more orders were added to the , the Tusca ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Crepidoma

    • Crepidoma is an architectural term for part of the structure of ancient Greek buildings. The crepidoma is the multilevel platform on which the superstructure of the building is erected. The crepidoma usually has three levels. Each level typically decreases in size incrementally going upwards, forming a series of steps ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Diaulos (architecture)

    • Diaulos, (from Gr. δι-, double, and αὐλός, pipe) in ancient Greek architecture, was a peristyle round the great court of the palaestra, described by Vitruvius, which measured two stadia (1,200 feet (370 m).) in length, on the south side this peristyle had two rows of columns, so that in stormy ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Distyle

    • A Distyle is a small temple-like structure with two columns. By extension a Distyle can also mean a Distyle in antis, the original design of the Greek temple, where two columns are set between two antae. Hellenistic Money box in the shape of a temple ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Distyle in antis

    • In classical architecture, Distyle in antis or abusively simply Distyle denotes a temple with the side walls extending to the front of the porch and terminating with two antae, the pediment being supported by two pilasters or sometimes caryatids. This is the earliest type of temple structure in Greece. An example is th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Doric order

    • The Doric order was one of the three orders of ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. The Doric is most easily recognised by the simple circular capitals at the top of columns. It was the earliest and in its essence the simplest of the orders, though s ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Greek gardens

    • A distinction is made between Greek gardens, made in ancient Greece, and Hellenistic gardens, made under the influence of Greek culture in late classical times. Little is known about either. Before the coming of proto-Greeks into the Aegean, Minoan culture represented gardens, in the form of subtly tamed wild-seem ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Geison

    • Geison (Ancient Greek: γεῖσον – often interchangeable with somewhat broader term cornice) is an architectural term of relevance particularly to ancient Greek and Roman buildings, as well as archaeological publications of the same. The geison is the part of the entablature that projects outwa ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Greek Baths

    • "The history of public baths begins in Greece in the sixth century B.C.," said by Françoise de Bonneville in his book The Book of the Bath. Greeks original form of bathing consisted of nothing more than a quick plunge into icy water until the people of Laconica came upon the idea of a hot-air bath. The hot-air b ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ancient Greek temple

    • Greek temples (Ancient Greek: Ναός, Naós "dwelling", semantically distinct from Latin templum ("temple") were structures built to house deity statues within Greek sanctuaries in ancient Greek religion. The temple interiors did not serve as meeting places, since the sacrifices and rituals dedicated to the ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Har Senaim

    • Har Senaim

      Har Senaim or Senaim is an archaeological site that sits on a peak near Mount Hermon in the Israeli-occupied portion of the Golan Heights, 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) north east of Kiryat Shmona and 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) from Banias. The site features a Roman temple and settlement that has been included in a group of ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hippodrome

    • The hippodrome (Greek: ἱππόδρομος) was an ancient Grecian stadium for horse racing and chariot racing. The name is derived from the Greek words hippos (ἵππος; "horse") and dromos (δρόμος; "course"). The term is used in the modern French language and som ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hypaethral

    • Hypaethral is an ancient temple with no roof. (From the Latin hypaethrus, from Ancient Greek ὕπαιθρος hupaithros ὑπό hupo- "under" and αἰθήρ aither "sky, air".) It was described by the Roman architect Vitruvius in his treatise On Architecture written for the emperor ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hypotrachelium

    • The hypotrachelium is the upper part or groove in the shaft of a Doric column, beneath the trachelium. The Greek form is hypotrakhelion. In classical architecture, it is the space between the annulet of the echinus and the upper bed of the shafts, including, according to C. R. Cockerell, the three grooves or sinkings ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Imbrex and tegula

    • The imbrex and tegula (plurals imbrices and tegulae) were overlapping roof tiles used in ancient Greek and Roman architecture as a waterproof and durable roof covering. They were made predominantly of fired clay, but also sometimes of marble, bronze or gilt. In Rome, they replaced wooden shingles, and were used on almo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Impluvium

    • The impluvium is the sunken part of the atrium in a Greek or Roman house (domus). Designed to carry away the rainwater coming through the compluvium of the roof, it is usually made of marble and placed about 30 cm below the floor of the atrium. Inspection (without excavation) of impluvia in Paestum, Pompeii and Rom ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ionic order

    • The Ionic order forms one of the three classical orders of classical architecture, the other two canonic orders being the Doric and the Corinthian. There are two lesser orders: the Tuscan (a plainer Doric), and the rich variant of Corinthian called the composite order, both added by 16th-century Italian architectural w ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lycosura

    • Lycosura

      Lycosura (Ancient Greek: Λυκόσουρα Lykosoura also Latin: Lycosoura) was a city of Arcadia said by Pausanias to be the oldest city in the world, though there is no evidence for its existence before the fourth century BCE. Its current significance is chiefly associated with the sanctuary ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Metope

    • In classical architecture, a metope (μετόπη) is a rectangular architectural element that fills the space between two triglyphs in a Doric frieze, which is a decorative band of alternating triglyphs and metopes above the architrave of a building of the Doric order. Metopes often had painted or sculptur ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Metroon

    • A metroon (Greek: Μητρῷον, Mētrō̂on or Mētrō̂ion) was an ancient Greek temple dedicated to a mother goddess. They were often devoted to Cybele, Demeter, or Rhea. Coordinates: 37°58′31″N 23°43′19″E / 37.975214°N 23.722077°E / ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Odeon (building)

    • Odeon is the name for several ancient Greek and Roman buildings built for music: singing exercises, musical shows, poetry competitions, and the like. The word comes from the Ancient Greek ᾨδεῖον, Ōideion, literally "singing place", or "building for musical competitions"; from the verb ἀΠ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Opisthodomos

    • An opisthodomos (ὀπισθόδομος, 'back room') can refer to either the rear room of an ancient Greek temple or to the inner shrine, also called the adyton ('not to be entered'); the confusion arises from the lack of agreement in ancient inscriptions. In modern scholarship, it usually refe ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Opus isodomum

    • Opus isodomum is an ancient technique of wall construction with ashlars. It uses perfectly cut, completely regular square stone blocks of equal height, and sometimes of the same length. In classical antiquity this technique was perfected and widely used, especially for public buildings (temples, theaters, amphitheater ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Orthostates

    • In the context of classical Greek architecture, orthostates are squared stone blocks much greater in height than depth that are usually built into the lower portion of a wall. They are so called because they seem to "stand upright" rather than to lie on their sides. In other contexts the English term is usually orthost ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Parthian style

    • The Parthian style is a style (sabk) of historical Iranian architecture. This style of architecture includes designs from the Seleucid (310–140 BCE), Parthian (247 BCE – 224 CE), and Sassanid (224–651 CE) eras, reaching its apex of development in the Sassanid period. Examples of this style are Ghal'eh ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Peribolos

    • In ancient Greek and Roman architecture, a peribolos was a court enclosed by a wall, especially one surrounding a sacred area such as a temple, shrine, or altar. Peribolos walls (which may also be referred to as temenos walls) were sometimes composed of stone posts and slabs supported by porous sills. Famous examples ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Peripteros

    • Peripteros (Greek: Περίπτερος) is the special name given to a type of ancient Greek or Roman temple surrounded by a portico with columns. It refers to the useful element for the architectural definition of buildings surrounded around their outside by a colonnade (pteron) on all four sides ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Peristasis (architecture)


    • Phallic architecture

    • Phallic architecture consciously or unconsciously creates a symbolic representation of the phallus. Buildings intentionally or unintentionally resembling the human penis are a source of amusement to locals and tourists in various places around the world. Deliberate phallic imagery is found in ancient cultures and in th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Prytaneion

    • A Prytaneion (Ancient Greek: Πρυτανεῖον) was seat of the Prytaneis (executive), and so the seat of government in ancient Greece. The term is used to describe any of a range of ancient structures where officials met (normally relating to the government of a city) but the term is also u ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Pseudodipteral

    • Pseudodipteral describes a Greek Temple with a single peristyle surrounding the cella at the distance of two intercolumns and one column. Unlike peripteral temples, there is a greater space between the columns of the peristyle and the cella; dipteral temples have two peristyles. Temple "G", in Selinunte, an ancient Gr ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Pseudoperipteral

    • In classical architecture, a pseudoperipteral temple is one with free standing columns in the front (colonnaded portico) whereas the columns along the sides are engaged in the peripheral walls of the naos or cella. The form is found in Greek temples, especially in the Hellenistic period, but in Roman temples a pseudope ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Rostral column

    • A rostral column is a type of victory column, originating in ancient Greece and Rome where they were erected to commemorate a naval military victory. Traditionally, rostra – the prows or rams of captured ships – were mounted on the columns. Rostral columns of the modern world include the Columbus Memorial at ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Sima (architecture)

    • In classical architecture, a sima is the upturned edge of a roof which acts as a gutter. Sima comes from the Greek , meaning bent upwards. The sima runs around all four sides of a building. The raking sima is continuous, while the simas on the other sides are broken by downspouts. Early simas feature tubular or half-c ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Stoa

    • A stoa (/ˈstoʊə/; plural, stoas,stoai, or stoae /ˈstoʊ.iː/), in ancient Greek architecture, is a covered walkway or portico, commonly for public use. Early stoas were open at the entrance with columns, usually of the Doric order, lining the side of the building; they created a safe, enveloping, protec ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • List of stoae

    • Stoas, in the context of ancient Greek architecture, are covered walkways or porticos, commonly for public usage. The following is a list of stoas located in Greece sorted alphabetically by the stoa's city of location, with the name appearing in bold text, followed by a short description and/or location of the stoa: ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Stylobate

    • In classical Greek architecture, a stylobate (Greek: στυλοβάτης) is the top step of the crepidoma, the stepped platform upon which colonnades of temple columns are placed (it is the floor of the temple). The platform was built on a leveling course that flattened out the ground immediately ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Superposed order

    • Superposed order (also superimposed) is one where successive storeys of a building have different orders. The most famous ancient example of such an order is the Colosseum at Rome, which had no less than four storeys of superposed orders. The superposition rules were developed in ancient Greece and were also actively u ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Xystus (architectural term)


    • Yammoune

    • Yammoune

      Yammoune is a lake, nature reserve, village and municipality situated 27 kilometres (17 mi) northwest of Baalbek in Baalbek District, Baalbek-Hermel Governorate, Lebanon. The village has a few hundred inhabitants. There are the ruins of a Phoenico-Greco-Roman temple in the village that are included in a groupin ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    Wikipedia
  • What Else?

    • Ancient Greek architecture

Extras