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  • Canadian health claims

    Canadian health claims


    • Canadian health claims by Health Canada, the department of the Canadian Government responsible for national health, has allowed five scientifically verified disease risk reduction claims to be used on food labels and on food advertising. Other countries, including the United States and Great Britain, have approved similar health claims on food labels.

      The Food Directorate of Health Canada is responsible for the development of policies, regulations and standards that relate to the use of health claims on foods. They assess whether health claims are truthful and not misleading by reviewing mandatory and voluntary pre-market submissions. Health Claims are regulated under the Food and Drugs Act and the Food and Drug Regulations. The Section 5(1) of the Food and Drugs Act requires that all health claims be truthful and not misleading or deceptive. The regulatory requirements permitting the use of claims vary significantly depending on the nature and type of the claim. Some claims may be made without pre-market approval provided they are truthful and not misleading or deceptive, whereas other claims, such as disease risk reduction or therapeutic claims are only allowed once a regulatory amendment specifying the conditions for their use has been completed

      Manufacturers are responsible for the accuracy of all information on the labels and advertisements for food and for compliance with all relevant food legislation and policies, including those pertaining to health claims. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is responsible for ensuring that industry complies with these requirements

      Food claims express the composition, quality, quantity or origin of a food product. Examples of Food Claims are "made in Canada" "Home-style Chilli" and "Fresh Pasta."

      Nutrition (nutrient content) claims characterizes the energy value of the food or the amount of a nutrient contained in a food. It provides a quick and easy way to identify foods with specific nutritional features of interest. Examples of nutrition claims are "low in sodium" sodium free" and "100 Calories per serving."

      Health claims is any representation in labeling or advertising that states, suggests, or implies that a relationship exists between consumption of a food or an ingredient in the food and a person's health.



      • high or very high in calcium,
      • may also be very high in Vitamin D,
      • cannot have more Phosphorus than Calcium,
      • must be limited in Alcohol, and
      • must have more than 40 kcal (unless it is a fruit or vegetable.
      • 1,000 mg per day for people aged 19–50 years
      • 1,200 mg per day for people over the age of 51 years.
      • canola
      • corn
      • flaxseed
      • olive
      • peanut
      • soybean
      • sunflower
      • Fresh, frozen, canned or dried vegetable
      • Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
      • Vegetable or fruit juice
      • Combination of the foods listed above
      • Potatoes, yams, cassava, plantain, corn, mushrooms, mature legumes and their juices*
      • Vegetable or fruit used as condiments, garnishes or flavourings- including maraschino cherries, glace fruit, candied fruit and onion flakes
      • Jams or jam type spreads, marmalades, preserves and jellies
      • Olives
      • Powdered vegetable or fruit
      • "Won't cause cavities"
      • "Does not promote tooth decay"
      • "Does not promote dental caries"
      • "Non-cariogenic"
      • "Tooth friendly" (this phrase is allowed to be printed with one of the previous phrases)
      • "xylitol, sorbitol, sorbitol syrup, mannitol, maltitol, maltitol syrup, isomalt, lactitol, hydrogenated starch hydrolysates, acesulfame K, aspartame, or sucralose"
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