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Health effects of chocolate


The health effects of chocolate are the possible positive and negative effects on health of eating chocolate.

Unconstrained consumption of large quantities of any energy-rich food, such as chocolate, without a corresponding increase in activity, increases the risk of obesity. Raw chocolate is high in cocoa butter, a fat removed during chocolate refining, then added back in varying proportions during manufacturing. Manufacturers may add other fats, sugars, and powdered milk as well.

Although considerable research has been conducted to evaluate the potential health benefits of consuming chocolate, there are insufficient studies to confirm any effect and no medical or regulatory authority has approved any health claim.

Overall evidence is insufficient to determine the relationship between chocolate consumption and acne. One preliminary study concluded that in males who are prone to acne, eating chocolate increases the severity of acne. Various studies point not to chocolate, but to the high glycemic nature of certain foods, like sugar, corn syrup, and other simple carbohydrates, as potential causes of acne, along with other possible dietary factors.

Food, including chocolate, is not typically viewed as addictive. Some people, however, may want or crave chocolate, leading to a self-described term, chocoholic.

It has been claimed that chocolate is an aphrodisiac, but there are no rigorous studies to prove this effect.

Reviews support a short-term effect of lowering blood pressure by consuming cocoa products, but there is no evidence of long-term cardiovascular health benefit. While daily consumption of cocoa flavanols (minimum dose of 200 mg) appears to benefit platelet and vascular function, there is no good evidence to support an effect on heart attacks or strokes.

Chocolate contains caffeine and theobromine, both mild stimulants,


Type of chocolate Total phenolics (mg/100g) Flavonoids (mg/100g) Theobromine (mg/100g)
Dark chocolate 579 28 883
Milk chocolate 160 13 125
White chocolate 126 8 0

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Wikipedia

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