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Eastern European Time


Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+02:00 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. The zone uses daylight savings time, so that it uses UTC+03:00 during the summer.

A number of African countries use UTC+02:00 all year long, where it is called Central Africa Time (CAT), although Egypt and Libya also use the term Eastern European Time.

The following countries, parts of countries, and territories use Eastern European Time all year round:

The following countries, parts of countries, and territories use Eastern European Time during the winter only:

The following countries, parts of countries, and territories use Eastern European Time in the past:

Sometimes, due to its use on Microsoft Windows, FLE Standard Time (for Finland, Lithuania, Estonia, or sometimes Finland, Latvia, Estonia) or GTB Standard Time (for Greece, Turkey, Bulgaria) are used to refer to Eastern European Time.

Since political, in addition to purely geographical, criteria are used in the drawing of time zones, it follows that actual time zones do not precisely adhere to meridian lines. The EET (UTC+2) time zone, were it drawn by purely geographical terms, would consist of exactly the area between meridians 22°30' E and 37°30' E. As a result, there are European locales that despite lying in an area with a "physical" UTC+2 time, actually use another time zone; likewise, there are European areas that have gone for UTC+2, even though their "physical" time zone is different from that. Following is a list of such anomalies:

These areas have sunrises and sunsets at least half an hour earlier than places on the UTC+1 meridian.

Winter only

Year round


    UTC−01:00 Cape Verde Time
    UTC±00:00 Greenwich Mean Time
    UTC±00:00
UTC+01:00
Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich Mean Time+1
    UTC+01:00 West Africa Time /
Central European Time
    UTC+01:00
UTC+02:00
West Africa Time
West Africa Summer Time
    UTC+02:00 Central Africa Time /
South African Standard Time /
Eastern European Time
    UTC+03:00 East Africa Time
    UTC+04:00 Mauritius Time / Seychelles Time
    UTC+02:00 Eastern European Time
    UTC+02:00


UTC+03:00
Eastern European Time /
Israel Standard Time
Eastern European Summer Time /
Israel Summer (Daylight) Time
    UTC+03:00 Further-eastern European Time
Arabia Standard Time
    UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time
Iran Daylight Time
    UTC+04:00 Gulf Standard Time
Colour Legal time vs local mean time
1 h ± 30 m behind
0 h ± 30 m
1 h ± 30 m ahead
2 h ± 30 m ahead
3 h ± 30 m ahead

  • Moscow used EET in years 1922–30 and 1991–92.
  • Belarus, in years 1922–30 and 1990–2011
  • In Poland this time was used in years 1918–22.
  • In time of World War II, Germany implemented MET (CET) in east occupied territories.
  • Republic of Crimea and Sevastopol used EET as part of Ukraine in years 1991-94 and 1996-2014
  • Turkey, used EET in years 1910-1978 and re-used it again in years 1985-2016. Now uses year round DST timezone called Turkey Time (TRT). The Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus also uses TRT.
  • Belarus is located between 23°11′E and 32°47′E and is thus fully located with the physical UTC+2 area, but it uses UTC+3 year around.
  • Practically all European Russia west of Moscow; this includes the chunk of land from Murmansk all the way south to Belgorod, including the cities of St. Petersburg, Novgorod, and Pskov, to name only a few. (The westernmost point of contiguous Russia, near Lavry, Pskov Oblast, 27°19' E, is actually the westernmost point in European Russia where UTC+3 is applied.) This also includes the city of Anapa, at the westernmost tip of the Krasnodar Krai near the entrance to the Sea of Azov, at 37°22' E.
  • Western Turkey.
  • The Norway–Russia–Finland "tri-zone" point at Muotkavaara (see Central European Time) is surrounded by three different times in winter, two in summer. It had three time zones year-around before 2014.
  • Two of the four tripoints of Belarus and the tripoint of the Kaliningrad Region are surrounded by three different times in winter.
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