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Animal nutrition


Animal nutrition focuses on the dietary needs of domesticated animals, primarily those in agriculture and food production.

There are seven major classes of nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, fibre, minerals, protein, vitamin, and water.

The macronutrients (excluding fiber and water) provide structural material (amino acids from which proteins are built, and lipids from which cell membranes and some signaling molecules are built) and energy. Some of the structural material can be used to generate energy internally, and in either case it is measured in joules or calories (sometimes called "kilocalories" and on other rare occasions written with a capital C to distinguish them from little 'c' calories). Carbohydrates and proteins provide 17 kJ approximately (4 kcal) of energy per gram, while fats provide 37 kJ (9 kcal) per gram., though the net energy from either depends on such factors as absorption and digestive effort, which vary substantially from instance to instance. Vitamins, minerals, fiber, and water do not provide energy, but are required for other reasons. A third class dietary material, fiber (i.e., non-digestible material such as cellulose), seems also to be required, for both mechanical and biochemical reasons, though the exact reasons remain unclear.

Molecules of carbohydrates and fats consist of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. Carbohydrates range from simple monosaccharides (glucose, fructose, galactose) to complex polysaccharides (starch). Fats are triglycerides, made of assorted fatty acid monomers bound to glycerol backbone. Some fatty acids, but not all, are essential in the diet: they cannot be synthesized in the body. Protein molecules contain nitrogen atoms in addition to carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. The fundamental components of protein are nitrogen-containing amino acids, some of which are essential in the sense that humans cannot make them internally. Some of the amino acids are convertible (with the expenditure of energy) to glucose and can be used for energy production just as ordinary glucose. By breaking down existing protein, some glucose can be produced internally; the remaining amino acids are discarded, primarily as urea in urine. This occurs normally only during prolonged starvation.


Family Sources Possible Benefits
flavonoids berries, herbs, vegetables, wine, grapes, tea general antioxidant, oxidation of LDLs, prevention of arteriosclerosis and heart disease
isoflavones (phytoestrogens) soy, red clover, kudzu root general antioxidant, prevention of arteriosclerosis and heart disease, easing symptoms of menopause, cancer prevention
isothiocyanates cruciferous vegetables cancer prevention
monoterpenes citrus peels, essential oils, herbs, spices, green plants, atmosphere cancer prevention, treating gallstones
organosulfur compounds chives, garlic, onions cancer prevention, lowered LDLs, assistance to the immune system
saponins beans, cereals, herbs Hypercholesterolemia, Hyperglycemia, Antioxidant, cancer prevention,

Anti-inflammatory

capsaicinoids all capiscum (chile) peppers topical pain relief, cancer prevention, cancer cell apoptosis

  • Calcium, a common electrolyte, but also needed structurally structural (for muscle and digestive system health, bones, some forms neutralizes acidity, may help clear toxins, and provide signaling ions for nerve and membrane functions)
  • Chlorine as chloride ions; very common electrolyte; see sodium, below
  • Magnesium, required for processing ATP and related reactions (builds bone, causes strong peristalsis, increases flexibility, increases alkalinity)
  • Phosphorus, required component of bones; essential for energy processing
  • Potassium, a very common electrolyte (heart and nerve health)
  • Sodium, a very common electrolyte; not generally found in dietary supplements, despite being needed in large quantities, because the ion is very common in food: typically as sodium chloride, or common salt
  • Sulfur for three essential amino acids and therefore many proteins (skin, hair, nails, liver, and pancreas)
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Wikipedia

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